Hooker BlackHeart Log-Style Headers for GEN III Hemi


Installing a Gen III Hemi into vintage Detroit Iron keeps getting more manageable with Holley’s continued development of everything that is Hemi. Recently, Hooker BlackHeart announced all-new shorty swap headers (part no. BH2375). The design of the headers fits a wide range of swap applications where clearance is limited.

The Hooker BlackHeart headers install on several Mopar platforms. The headers will work on the ’66-’72 b-bodies and all e-bodies, both with a manual steering box. Additionally, the BlackHeart headers fit well with a Hemi swap into ’72-‘93 2WD D100/150 truck or an ’87-’04 2WD Dakota.

Above Left: The Hooker BlackHeart log-style Hemi swap headers are constructed of 304 stainless steel and designed for limited space applications. Above Right: The Hemi headers fit certain b-bodies and all e-bodies with manual steering and a couple of decades of D100, D150, and Dakota Hemi swap engine bays. 

The high-quality headers are constructed from 304 stainless steel and feature beefy 3/8-inch-thick flanges, 18-gauge 1 ¾-inch primary tubes, and two-bolt, 2.50-inch collectors. stainless increases the header durability and corrosion resistance. Hooker engineered the headers to provide clearance around the starter (accommodates left- or right-side mounting), brake booster, steering shaft, and steering box. Moreover, shorty headers offer excellent clearance for automatic transmissions (A727, 46RE, 46RH, 545RFE, NAG1, and 8HP70) and the TR6060 manual transmission.

Above: The Hooker BlackHeart headers outflow factory cast iron manifolds and are nearly as easy to install as the factory manifolds. 

BlackHeart or White Box engine mounts and the appropriate transmission adapter are required to install the headers. The 2003-2008 5.7-liter Hemis require header gaskets 7594 (or Mopar equivalent). The 2009-up 5.7L engines (no EGR) use header gaskets 7595 (or Mopar equivalent). Lastly, the 2009-up 5.7L and 2011-up 6.4L Hemis (with EGR and heat shield) use Mopar 5045495AA and 5045496AA. Lastly, the Hooker BlackHeart 304 stainless steel exhaust products are covered by a limited lifetime warranty.

Above: The BlackHeart swap headers come with all the mounting hardware (except the header gaskets) to complete the installation. The quality fasteners should keep the header cinched to reduce exhaust leaks (when used with a Hooker or Mopar header gasket).

Depending upon your application, the b- and e-bodies may require a single manual steering box bolt replacement with a button head cap screw for additional clearance if needed. In addition, the passenger side control arm may require a minor clearance notch on the ‘97- ‘04 Dodge Dakota. Finally, the headers earned an emission level 8 grading, which means the headers are legal for street use if your vehicle usage falls into one of five categories, listed on the Hooker BlackHeart webpage.

Above: The entire kit comes with everything shown and a four-page detailed instruction sheet that lists the steps for installation and minor modifications to the vehicle. In most cases, no modification of the vehicle is necessary. 

While the BlackHeart shorty headers may not extract the maximum engine performance of full, equal length headers designed for race track applications, a nice street cruiser will profit from the log-style headers. A few benefits of the headers include great fit, ease of installation, and performance that exceeds the factory exhaust manifolds.

If you are looking to slip a Hemi between the fenders, Hooker BlackHeart has a header offering to meet your needs from mild to wild. Also, take a few minutes to look over all the Hemi products offered by all the Holley companies.

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Chris Holley

Technical Contributor Chris has been a college professor for 24 years; the last 19 spent at Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport, PA. During the day Chris instructs automotive HVAC and electrical/electronic classes, and high-performance classes, which include the usage of a chassis dyno, flow benches, and various machining equipment. Chris owns a '67 Dart, a '75 Dart, a '06 Charger, a '12 Cummins turbo diesel Ram, and he is a multi-time track champion (drag racing) with his '69 340 Dart, which he has owned 33 years.

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