Holley Features Newly Expanded SPAL Electric Fan Lineup


Back in the 1960s, the height of engine cooling fan technology was pretty much a viscous clutch driving a seven-blade fan via pulley and V-belt. For most engines, that package was enough. However, as many found out, the addition of headers, fender-rattling camshafts, and other performance parts quickly made the factory mechanical fan setup inadequate.

Electric fans started to see mainstream OEM usage in the 1980s and have been a factory-equipped staple since. Of course, the main advantage is reducing engine drag. Rather than being run by a belt, electric fans are driven by a 12-volt motor that pulls a relatively small amount of amperage from the alternator. Not only does it save on horsepower, but it makes the fan infinitely adjustable for a variety of speeds and heat loads.

Companies like SPAL have been perfecting cooling fan technology and continue to bring to the market a wide range of electric fans for a wide range of applications. SPAL recently expanded their already-impressive lineup with the addition of eight new electric fans with capacities ranging from 260 CFM to 1,628 CFM. Both pullers and pushers are available with sealed motors that are sure to provide years of trouble-free service life.

  • P/N 30100394 – 7.50” electric puller fan, low profile, 407 CFM
  • P/N 30100452 – 9.00” electric puller fan, low profile, 625 CFM
  • P/N 30101512 – 11.00” electric puller fan, medium profile, 1,300 CFM
  • P/N 30102022 – 11.00” electric puller fan, high performance, 1,310 CFM
  • P/N 30103021 – 5.20” electric pusher fan, medium profile, 260 CFM
  • P/N 30102156 – 12.00” electric puller fan, extreme performance, 1,404 CFM
  • P/N 30102546 – 12.00” electric pusher fan, high performance, 1,628 CFM
  • P/N 30102564 – 11.00” electric puller fan, high performance, 1,463 CFM

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Kent Will

Kent Will

News Editor Kent grew up in the shop with his old man and his '70 Charger R/T. His first car was a 1969 Super Bee project when Kent was fourteen. That restoration experience lead to pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and a career in manufacturing. Since then, the garage has expanded to include a '67 Satellite, a '72 Scamp, and a 2010 Mopar '10 Challenger.

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