Video: QA1 Explains How Sway Bars Work


Sway bars tend to be one of those parts that we know it works and helps the vehicle from swaying, but normally do not think much past that. If your car has one then why would you need a new one? Many classic Mopar cars were not optioned with a sway bar and even if they were, they might not be working as well as they could. QA1 takes us through how they work and maybe you can decide if a new QA1 sway bar is what you need.

Heavy body roll (swaying) due to no sway bar or undersized sway bar is not fun. It can also be very unsafe driving under those conditions. We understand that in the past sway bars were an option and some cars did not come with them, but companies like QA1 have developed new sway bars to cure that issue. 

Over the years engineers vehicle manufactures have made sway bars a mandatory option and are used in everything from trucks to high performance cars. By increasing the diameter, using different materials, arm lengths and more, sway bars can be finely tuned to your specific vehicle needs. 

QA1 has been a leader in developing suspension components to help improve your vehicles ride and handling. Sway bars play a big part of making your classic Mopar handle like a modern day car. QA1 has developed bolt-on sway bar kits for A, B, and E-body Mopars along with some trucks and other Mopar cars. 

These QA1 sway bars can bolt-on in minutes and dramatically change the handling of your ride. Decreasing body roll, keeping tires firmly planted, better launches and more are only a few of the effects you will see after bolting on a QA1 sway bar. 

Then stepping up to the next level of handling, you could upgrade to one of QA1’s coil-over kits. The coil-over kits are a whole other level of handling which we will have to revisit in a future article.

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Gavin Wollenburg

Editor – gavin.wollenburg@shawgroupmedia.com Gavin grew up around Mopars in his lakeside home in Ohio, his father showing him nearly everything he needed to know about haulin' some serious rear in his '72 Dart Swinger. Since then, he's made his little A-Body a serious autocross contender and regularly shows the modern boys how an old Dart does it!

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