Redline Gauge Works Refurbs A Retro Chrysler Cluster


The neat thing about old cars is that any one of them can be customized in any way. Some owners prefer bone-stock, many like the day-two look with subtle enhancements, and others need all-out modernization. When it comes to dashes, Redline Gauge Works (RGW) can accommodate each or a mixture of all three.

No matter the make, model, or brand, they can bring a gauge cluster back to its former glory or completely revamp it into something the OEM never came close to offering. That’s exactly what they did to this 1966 Chrysler Newport cluster. While the factory dash was plenty stylish with a beautiful sweeping speedometer, the rest of the assembly’s internals were a little lacking on informational availability. RGW took it from mild to wild with the addition of some Rallye-esque attributes.

“The coolest feature was the replacement of the water temp and oil psi warning lights with actual gauges and a tachometer added to where the shift indicator was, all done in such a way that looks factory,” says Shannon Hudson, owner of RGW.

“We used all new modern Speedhut stepper motor internals, made in the USA. We also did an amp to voltmeter conversion which is standard with all Hemi swaps and we did a complete rebuild of the original mechanical speedometer. White LED’s were added for better night time illumination as well.” No doubt, this gauge pack will look right at home in a super cool ’66 C-body.

Share this post

Kent Will

Kent Will

News Editor Kent grew up in the shop with his old man and his '70 Charger R/T. His first car was a 1969 Super Bee project when Kent was fourteen. That restoration experience lead to pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and a career in manufacturing. Since then, the garage has expanded to include a '67 Satellite, a '72 Scamp, and a 2010 Mopar '10 Challenger.

2 comments

Add yours
  1. Avatar
    Mike66Chryslers 17 April, 2020 at 10:21 Reply

    That is beautiful, and adding a tach in the PRNDL opening is a great idea. I’m very familiar with the internals of these clusters. Some interesting surgery would have been required to the the aluminum housing in order to fit those oil and temp gauges in there.

Post a new comment

No Thanks