Bad to the Blue: Larry Dewees’ 1968 Plymouth GTX


The Plymouth GTX was first introduced in 1967, and was regarded as the “gentleman’s muscle car.” In 1968, the GTX underwent a change, and became available as a “B-Body” Mopar, and was intended to be a more “upscale” version of the Plymouth Road Runner, which was another well-known Mopar at the time.

Larry Dewees of Cypress, CA has great taste when it comes to classic Mopars. Alongside his 1948 Plymouth gasser we previously featured, Dewees owns yet another classic Mopar, a beautiful 1968 Plymouth GTX RestoMod. This Electric Blue beauty is an original GTX, retrofitted with a 528 cubic-inch Hemi engine. Originally, this car was painted in Avocado Green, and came with a 440 cubic-inch V8. Upon acquiring this car, Dewees removed the 440, sold it, and shoehorned the 528. The engine was so big that a hole needed to be cut into the hood, and an air scoop had to be fitted.

The 528, is a serious motor, boasting 712 horsepower at 6,800RPM. The bore is 4.500 with a 4.150 stroke. Compression is set at 10.5 to 1. Torque is 609ft lbs at 5,600RPM. The engine block is from Mopar and Westech Performance, along with the crankshaft & forged pistons. Beam rods are K1 Hs. A Milodon 6 quart Hemi oil pan, windage tray and timing chain cover were utilized for this build. Edelbrock supplied the cylinder heads, and fuel pump. An Iskenderian solid roller cam was also added. Carburetors are two Holley 750cfms, both of which are four-barrel carbs, fitted to a Stage V dual- quad manifold. The valve covers are reproductions from Stage V.

The transmission is a rebuilt RM21 23 spline-cast 4-speed. Originally, this car was equipped as an automatic, and was converted to a manual later on. The original factory Hurst shifter was rebuilt by Brewer’s Performance. A factory cast iron bell housing was added, with a McLeod SFI approved flywheel, RST dual disk clutch, and throw-out bearing.

All around, the GTX is fitted with 11” non-power drum brakes. A dual master cylinder was replaced as well with front and rear brake lines. The hardware and self-adjusters were also replaced, along with the front wheel bearings, and driveshaft. Hemi conversion motor mounts are from Schumacher. The transmission mount was also replaced.

The suspension consists of a Mopar 8¾ axle housing with a 489 case, 3.55 gears, factory Sure-Grip, Green bearings, and leaf springs, which were refurbished to factory specifications. However, the front leaf spring mounts were replaced, along with the bushings and shackles. The shock absorbers are from Monroe. Dewees also replaced the pinion snubber with a stock unit, sway bar and bushings with factory parts, end-links, upper ball joints, control arm bushings, and idle arm.

The exhaust is from TTI. A pair, of 2 1/8” headers with 3 ½” collectors, a 3” X-pipe, 3” Spintech 3000XLP mufflers, and QTP 3 ½” electric cutouts; which allow the car to be much louder, at any given time.

The interior is all stock, except for a couple of extras that were added. The seats are black with dark tan accents. The stock radio was converted to AM/FM stereo with Pioneer speakers. Seat belts are factory stock. The original gauges have been restored, and the original steering wheel was kept.

Wheels and tires are American Racing Torq Thrust Ds, with Mickey Thompson ET Street tires in the back, and BF Goodrich tires in the front. Currently, Larry Dewees is a member of the Mopar Knights Car Club of Southern California, and can be seen with this car, or his 1948 Plymouth Gasser.

You can catch Larry at the Carl’s Jr. Cruise Night on Beach Blvd in Westminster, CA held on Tuesday evenings from 4PM-8PM, or at the Garden Grove Car Show held every Friday on Historic Main Street in Garden Grove, CA. This is one heck of a ’68 GTX you won’t want to miss.

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Maxx Kominsky

Feature Contributor Maxx is a Southern Californian hot rodder and classic car aficionado. With a passion for vintage surf rock, American iron and everything tied to these two genres, Maxx brings his love and passion to Mopar Connection with aplomb.

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