Hughes Engines Tech Center: Two Much Magnum


Last month, we shared some basic “Level 1” modifications for 5.2L and 5.9L Magnum engines from the experts over at Hughes Engines. The parts list consisted of a bunch of bolt-ons that don’t require much by way of tools or time. An afternoon of wrenching can add a few horses, but what about the gluttons for go-fast? For those that prefer a bit more grease under the fingernails and a skosh more scat under the hood, Hughes put together a list of “Level 2” mods that are sure to accomplish both:

LEVEL 2

  1. Modified throttle bodies. The next step in the performance ladder involves allowing more air into the engine through the use of high flow throttle bodies. We suggest one of our modified OEM throttle bodies. There is a lot of hype about throttle body bore sizes, and we all know bigger is better—Ah, but not true with throttle bore size. What you are really looking for is air flow. Your engine does not care, and neither do you, what the throttle bore size is. What you and your engine do care about is how much air the throttle body can flow. For example, our 50mm “BIG GULP” throttle body will out flow all the 52 mm throttle bodies on the market. Our “BIG GULP” (P/N HUG 5504) flows over 1000 CFM. These are modified OEM throttle bodies so you know everything will bolt up and fit correctly. And the price is right.

For those who don’t need maximum power but still want improved performance, we have our line of Stage 1 modified stock throttle bodies for those applications. They are more mild and for those applications that are not after every last ounce of power (P/N HUG 5501).

  1. Intake manifolds. You only need to know one name—our “FI-Air Gap”. This manifold does everything better than any other manifold on the market (P/N HUG 5409), and they are always in stock. Check out the installation video on our website too!
  2. Camshafts. (Here he goes, talking about camshafts again). When you remove and replace the intake manifold, you are nearly halfway to installing the camshaft. If you are even thinking about a cam, you are going to save yourself a lot of time, doing the same job over again when you put the cam in later, so why not do it now and be done with it?

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Kent Will

Kent Will

News Editor Kent grew up in the shop with his old man and his '70 Charger R/T. His first car was a 1969 Super Bee project when Kent was fourteen. That restoration experience lead to pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering and a career in manufacturing. Since then, the garage has expanded to include a '67 Satellite, a '72 Scamp, and a 2010 Mopar '10 Challenger.

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